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August 13th, 11:11 am

Millie 🦋 ... See MoreSee Less

Millie 🦋Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

Very cute 💜

August 1st, 8:00 am

Infectious Diseases to Vaccinate Against

🦠 Canine Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus is a disease that affects dogs of all ages but is most serious in young pups and older dogs. The virus attacks the intestines causing bloodstained diarrhoea, uncontrollable vomiting and severe abdominal pain. Dogs can die from severe dehydration despite intensive veterinary care.

It is not necessary to have direct contact with other dogs for the disease to be spread. The virus is so persistent that the infected dog’s environment needs to be cleaned with a potent disinfectant to prevent spread to other dogs. Outbreaks occur regularly throughout Australia, especially in summer.

🦠 Canine Distemper

Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral disease that can affect dogs of any age with young puppies being at highest risk.

Symptoms vary but can include fever, coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite and depression. Muscle tremors, fits and paralysis usually occur later in the disease. Treatment is usually ineffective and the recovery rate very low. Dogs that do recover may have permanent brain damage.

🦠 Canine Hepatitis

Canine hepatitis is a viral disease which, like distemper is extremely contagious and often fatal. Dogs of any age can become infected, however severe cases are rare in dogs over two years of age.
Symptoms include high fever, depression, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea and acute abdominal pain. In severe cases death can occur within 24 to 36 hours. Dogs that recover may develop long term liver and kidney problems and can act as carriers spreading the disease to other dogs for many months.

🦠 Canine Cough

Canine cough is a condition produced by several highly infectious diseases, which can be easily spread wherever dogs congregate, such as parks, walking tracks, shows, obedience schools and boarding kennels. Among the infectious agents associated with canine cough is the bacterium known as Bordetella bronchiseptica and the canine viruses parainfluenza, adenovirus type 2 and distemper.

Affected dogs have a dry hacking cough which can persist for several weeks. It is distressing for pet dogs and their owners. It is a major problem for working and sporting dogs.
... See MoreSee Less

Infectious Diseases to Vaccinate Against 

🦠 Canine Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus is a disease that affects dogs of all ages but is most serious in young pups and older dogs. The virus attacks the intestines causing bloodstained diarrhoea, uncontrollable vomiting and severe abdominal pain. Dogs can die from severe dehydration despite intensive veterinary care.

It is not necessary to have direct contact with other dogs for the disease to be spread. The virus is so persistent that the infected dog’s environment needs to be cleaned with a potent disinfectant to prevent spread to other dogs. Outbreaks occur regularly throughout Australia, especially in summer.

🦠 Canine Distemper

Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral disease that can affect dogs of any age with young puppies being at highest risk.

Symptoms vary but can include fever, coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite and depression. Muscle tremors, fits and paralysis usually occur later in the disease. Treatment is usually ineffective and the recovery rate very low. Dogs that do recover may have permanent brain damage.

🦠 Canine Hepatitis

Canine hepatitis is a viral disease which, like distemper is extremely contagious and often fatal. Dogs of any age can become infected, however severe cases are rare in dogs over two years of age.
Symptoms include high fever, depression, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea and acute abdominal pain. In severe cases death can occur within 24 to 36 hours. Dogs that recover may develop long term liver and kidney problems and can act as carriers spreading the disease to other dogs for many months.

🦠 Canine Cough

Canine cough is a condition produced by several highly infectious diseases, which can be easily spread wherever dogs congregate, such as parks, walking tracks, shows, obedience schools and boarding kennels. Among the infectious agents associated with canine cough is the bacterium known as Bordetella bronchiseptica and the canine viruses parainfluenza, adenovirus type 2 and distemper.

Affected dogs have a dry hacking cough which can persist for several weeks. It is distressing for pet dogs and their owners. It is a major problem for working and sporting dogs.

July 31st, 7:00 am

This is Elmo, who is about to head into training to be a service dog. At the moment he is fully trained in stealing hearts 🐾💕 ... See MoreSee Less

This is Elmo, who is about to head into training to be a service dog. At the moment he is fully trained in stealing hearts 🐾💕

July 30th, 2:54 pm

🐾 FOUND

Male Bull Terrier found in Morayfield. If you know this fella please call the clinic on 5498 6555
... See MoreSee Less

🐾 FOUND

Male Bull Terrier found in Morayfield. If you know this fella please call the clinic on 5498 6555

July 30th, 10:10 am

Miss Daisy presented with frequent urination (pollakiuria) and presence of blood in the urine (haematuria). Following an ultrasound, a 0.5cm stone was found inside her bladder. This requires a surgical removal (cystotomy). Daisy recovered very well from the anaesthetic and is on the road to a full recovery 🐾 ... See MoreSee Less

Miss Daisy presented with frequent urination (pollakiuria) and presence of blood in the urine (haematuria). Following an ultrasound, a 0.5cm stone was found inside her bladder. This requires a surgical removal (cystotomy). Daisy recovered very well from the anaesthetic and is on the road to a full recovery 🐾Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

Cutie pie. That stone is nearly as big as Daisy. Hopefully no more ❤

Nawww Daisy!!!

July 29th, 9:00 am

When should puppies go to their new home and when is too early?

Puppies should not leave their mothers or litter mates before 8 weeks of age as the mother plays an important role when teaching the pups about biting, toileting, socialisation etc.

If pups are taken away from their mother too early you may see behavioural problems such as lack of confidence, be slow to bond with their new owners, or attach to strongly to the new owner and panic when left alone.

These pups can also display more aggressive behaviour when deprived of its mothers lessons. They also have trouble acting with other puppies or dogs, not having being taught the correct way to socialise.
... See MoreSee Less

When should puppies go to their new home and when is too early? 

Puppies should not leave their mothers or litter mates before 8 weeks of age as the mother plays an important role when teaching the pups about biting, toileting, socialisation etc. 

If pups are taken away from their mother too early you may see behavioural problems such as lack of confidence, be slow to bond with their new owners, or attach to strongly to the new owner and panic when left alone. 

These pups can also display more aggressive behaviour when deprived of its mothers lessons. They also have trouble acting with other puppies or dogs, not having being taught the correct way to socialise.

Comment on Facebook

Some Humans could take note of this

Shane Young

July 28th, 10:01 am

Puppy Vaccination

Puppies are ‘temporarily’ protected against many diseases by antibodies received through their mother’s milk. These maternal antibodies decline in the first few months of their lives, however until they drop sufficiently they can also neutralise vaccines. This is why a series of vaccinations are necessary in a puppy. We recommend puppies are vaccinated between 6 and 8 weeks of age, followed by a booster vaccination at 12 weeks and a final vaccination at 16 weeks. Each puppy will be assessed on an individual basis to ensure their complete vaccination needs are met.

Adult Dog Vaccination

The immunity from puppy vaccination weakens over time and your pet can again become susceptible to disease. Annual health checks and booster vaccinations, as required, will provide the best protection for the life of your pet.
... See MoreSee Less

Puppy Vaccination

Puppies are ‘temporarily’ protected against many diseases by antibodies received through their mother’s milk. These maternal antibodies decline in the first few months of their lives, however until they drop sufficiently they can also neutralise vaccines. This is why a series of vaccinations are necessary in a puppy. We recommend puppies are vaccinated between 6 and 8 weeks of age, followed by a booster vaccination at 12 weeks and a final vaccination at 16 weeks. Each puppy will be assessed on an individual basis to ensure their complete vaccination needs are met.

Adult Dog Vaccination

The immunity from puppy vaccination weakens over time and your pet can again become susceptible to disease. Annual health checks and booster vaccinations, as required, will provide the best protection for the life of your pet.

July 27th, 8:40 am

ONE CUSTOMER AT A TIME PLEASE

— If you have an appointment, please call the clinic when you have arrived and a nurse will be with you as soon as a consultation room is cleaned and ready

— We have a strict one person per pet rule to help adhere to social distancing as much as possible.

— If you would like to wait in your vehicle, please call the clinic to make us aware of your arrival and we will call you when a consultation is ready for you.

We thank you very much for your cooperation and apologise for any inconvenience

Clinic Number 5498 6555
... See MoreSee Less

ONE CUSTOMER AT A TIME PLEASE

— If you have an appointment, please call the clinic when you have arrived and a nurse will be with you as soon as a consultation room is cleaned and ready

— We have a strict one person per pet rule to help adhere to social distancing as much as possible.

— If you would like to wait in your vehicle, please call the clinic to make us aware of your arrival and we will call you when a consultation is ready for you. 

We thank you very much for your cooperation and apologise for any inconvenience 

Clinic Number 5498 6555

July 25th, 8:00 am

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Comment on Facebook

Alia Porter for rocky

July 23rd, 10:22 am

Weight Gain Post Neutering

Neutering your pet results in loss of certain hormones and a change in others. These changes result in a slower metabolism while increasing their appetite at the same time.

It is important to adjust your pets daily food intake to counteract the now slower metabolism 🐾
... See MoreSee Less

Weight Gain Post Neutering

Neutering your pet results in loss of certain hormones and a change in others. These changes result in a slower metabolism while increasing their appetite at the same time. 

It is important to adjust your pets daily food intake to counteract the now slower metabolism 🐾
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